SHINY COBRA

chicano art, low brow/pop surrealism, street art, contemporary art, pop culture
raptivism:

Keyvan Heydari aka CK, Iranian visual & graffiti artist featured at a #calligraphy conversations event in #oakland last night :)

raptivism:

Keyvan Heydari aka CK, Iranian visual & graffiti artist featured at a #calligraphy conversations event in #oakland last night :)

CHICANO ART MOVEMENT attends: ‘A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez’, From the Artists of OCLAN (Orange County Latino Artist Network) opening reception 2014

chicanoartmovement:

CAM:
On Saturday, March 1st, 2014 I attended the opening reception to 'A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez', From the Artists of OCLAN (Orange County Latino Artist Network) at the Orange County Center For Contemporary Art (OCCCA) in the city of Santa Ana, California. Which will run March 1st-29th 2014.

imageEmigdio Vasquez - (Left) “Hard Times” 36x46 1973 (Right) “Felix Camp” 30x36 1974


The opening reception took place during the monthly Downtown Santa Ana Artwalk and my focus was on attending the exhibition at OCCCA to view the wonderful artworks by the Latino artists who were participating. Especially Mr. Emigdio Vasquez's artworks that were accumulated for his tribute. Previous to this showcase I had only been able to view his works individually in group shows and examine the murals he has created in the city of Orange, California. So partaking in this exhibit was a priority for me to survey the artist work. Walking into the gallery I first came upon two large majestic artworks by Emigdio. “Hard Times" from his Street Scenes series and "Felix Camp" from the Workers series. Which were impressive pieces to be received in with at the Orange County Center For Contemporary Art (OCCCA) space.
imageEmigdio Vasquez - “A Sunday Afternoon at the Harmony Park” 20x35 1999


Once in the main gallery at OCCCA I took notice that the weekends precipitation did not keep away people for the 'A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez' exhibition. Which was healthily attended by supporters of the Chicano masters contributions to the movement. The exhibit did not just consist of Emigdio Vasquez's artworks, other participating exhibiting artists were:
Jess Valenzuela, Abram Moya Jr, Matthew Barrios Southgate, Jose Lozano, Ben Valenzuela, Henry Godines, Rosemary V Tuthill, Gregg Stone, and Guillermo Avalos. Reception festivities included a live performance by the band Manos De Fuego, they covered some classic Santana tunes while I was in attendance and kept the atmosphere upbeat.
imageJose Lozano - “The Red Balloon Lounge” 2013


It was also terrific to see my friend Jose Lozano’s artworks that were included in the show, and artist Henry Godines' fascinating, “5:30 PM Going Home" an Oil on masonite painting which had drawn me in with its surreal qualities. I contemplated on its subject matter and his attention to detail for sometime. Prior to leaving I even made a return trip to that specific artwork to bask in Mr. Godines' panel for another moment.
imageHenry Godines - “5:30 PM Going Home” Oil on masonite panel 20x28 inches


The main gallery at OCCCA housed the majority of Mr. Emidigo Vazquez's artworks in the exhibition. Recollecting, all the works in the A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez were original paintings, from his many different series he has created through the decades as a professional artist. Walking through the exhibit each of Mr. Vasquez's paintings became more engaging and as a whole narrated a much broader account of his lifes work. My favored Emigdio Vasquez's artworks in the tribute exhibition had to be, “A Sunday Afternoon at the Harmony Park”, in which the artist has depicted the Pachuco culture in celebration, and “Operation Gate Keeper”, where he presents one of the many obstacles the undocumented face while in search of financial stability. In addition, both were prime examples of the artist signature style.
imagePhoto of Manos De Fuego live performance at ‘A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez’, Orange County Center For Contemporary Art


I would like to thank artists Emigdio Vasquez, Rosemary Vasquez-Tuthill, Jose Lozano, Henry Godines and Stephen Anderson, Executive Director at Orange County Center For Contemporary Art (OCCCA) for the opportunity to share artwork in the exhibition.

For more information on 'A Tribute To Emigdio Vasquez', exhibition visit: www.occca.org
imageEmigdio Vasquez - “Operation Gate Keeper” 22x55 1994


More images visit: CHICANO ART MOVEMENT/Facebook page

artnet:

Millions For Bacon
A painting by Francis Bacon of a burglar he caught breaking into his house who went on to become his lover, sold at Christie’s in London for $70 Million. Consigned by Mexican financier David Martinez, it was purchased by an unnamed American collector. 
The event was the last and the largest of four evening postwar and contemporary art sales this week in London that generated a combined 260.9 million pounds. According to Bloomberg, bidding was global with wealthy new buyers from China, the Middle East and Russia helping to push up prices for blue-chip and emerging art stars.

artnet:

Millions For Bacon

A painting by Francis Bacon of a burglar he caught breaking into his house who went on to become his lover, sold at Christie’s in London for $70 Million. Consigned by Mexican financier David Martinez, it was purchased by an unnamed American collector. 

The event was the last and the largest of four evening postwar and contemporary art sales this week in London that generated a combined 260.9 million pounds. According to Bloomberg, bidding was global with wealthy new buyers from China, the Middle East and Russia helping to push up prices for blue-chip and emerging art stars.

arrestedmotion:

Shepard Fairey (@obeygiant) delivers some new hotness…  (at Pace Prints)

arrestedmotion:

Shepard Fairey (@obeygiant) delivers some new hotness… (at Pace Prints)

CHICANO ART MOVEMENT attends: Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA), opening reception for January - April 2014 exhibitions

chicanoartmovement:

CAM:
On Saturday January 18th, 2014 we attended the opening reception to Pasadena Museum of California Art’s (PMCA), January - April exhibitions. The exhibits on view were, Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California (Main Gallery), Serigrafía (Back Gallery) and Flora Kao’s: Homestead (Project Room). This would also be our first visit to PMCA.
image(Left to Right) Artists: Leonard Castellanos, Esther Hernandez and Xavier Viramontes.


Arriving at the Pasadena Museum of California Art our first viewing opportunities at the opening reception were, Flora Kao’s: Homestead and Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California, but we made a direct line to the exhibition I had been anticipating since hearing about the January - April 2014 shows, Serigrafía, which was located in the Back Gallery at the museum. I was excited to view the array of vintage Chicano posters that were to be displayed, some of which I had only ever been able to examine in jpeg form or in art catalogs. Walking into the gallery where Serigrafía was exhibited we were instantly drawn in with the vibrant palette of colors and powerful positive chicano messages in the artworks. The inventory of posters presented consisted from recent to vintage, with a handful of digitally reproduced and the remainder being silkscreened prints.
From what I learned, the basis of the Segrafia exhibition was to survey the "tradition of information design in Califonia’s Latino culture" and "examines how both aesthetics and portability are key aspects of the prints as communicative and educational objects."
image(Xico Gonzalez - “ChePata” 2006 silkscreen)


The posters that enticed me for a more meticulous observation in the Segrafia exhibition were, Esther Hernandez's, “Sun Mad" 1982, and Xaviver Viramotes’, “Boycott Grapes" 1973, which were created by the artists to bring fourth awareness of unsafe working conditions to farmworkers. Also notable was Xico Gonzalez’s “ChePata" 2006, a Che Guevara and Emiliano Zapata melded image which advocated against unjust immigration laws and practices of undocumented humans, along with Favianna Rodriguez's, “Resist U.S. Imperialism" 2003 print, which was a first-rate example of activist art.

Artists also represented in the exhibition were Jesus Barraza, Barbara Carrasco, Rene Castro, Melanie Cervantes, Enrique Chagoya, Ricardo Favela, Juan R. Fuentes, Rupert Garcia, Daniel González, Yolanda M. López, Linda Lucero, Estria Miyashiro, Malaquias Montoya, Gilda Posada, Celina Rodriguez, Jos Sances, Mark Vallen, and Ernesto Yerena.

This was a wonderful show that gave me a sense gratification being a guardian of Chicano prints and posters that are in my personal collection.
imageAlfredo Ramos Martinez - (Left) “La India de Tehuantepec” (Mujer de Tehuantepec) ca. 1930 (Middle) “La Madre India” (Right) “La Malinche” ca. 1940

After indulging and surveying Segrafia it was then time to move on and absorb some modern art history with the extraordinary Mexican artist Alfredo Ramos Matinez's (November 1871 - November 1946), Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California, which was located in the Main Gallery and is the largest gallery space at the Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA)
From my readings what I learned about the Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California exhibition, is that it was to bring fourth his travel and artistic output in California. The exhibit is also going to be used to "advocate for the inclusion of his works in histories of the visual art traditions of the region and ultimately aims to inspire a richer and more complex understanding of American art."
Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California exhibition will also be traveling to the Nevada Museum of Art, May 10 to August 17, 2014.
image(Alfredo Ramos Martinez - “Las Floreras” 1933 oil on canvas)

The first of Mr. Alfredo Ramos Martinez's beautiful artworks that lured me in the showcase was his largest and most prominent, "La Madre India" a grandeur work on paper which took and deserved the key real estate in the Main Gallery at the museum. When we walked into the gallery the room was filled and abuzz, you could feel the electricity from the enamored patrons. I have to say, I was very impressed with the mass amount of artworks accumulated for Mr. Alfredo Ramos Martinez's exhibition which took every bit of wall space to present. Picturing Mexico: Alfredo Ramos Martínez in California quickly became my favorite and the most stimulating of the three exhibitions at the Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA).
The second piece that caught me was Mr. Martinez’s “Vendedora de Alcatraces”, 1929 oil on canvas, in which the calla lily’s depicted reminded of the paintings of maestro Diego Rivera’s Alcatraces, but the blossoms were completely in Alfredo Ramos Martinez's style.
image(Alfredo Ramos Martinez - “Vendedores de Frutas con Canastas” ca. 1946 silkscreen)


After viewing those two major artworks Anita and I became captivated with every piece in the exhibit that proceeded. Other highlights for us included Mr. Alfredo Ramos Martinez's works on vintage newspaper and his vivid polychromatic paintings. One non-Martinez created piece that garnered most of our attention in the exhibition was an extraordinary intricate carved frame by Bernard Vandeuren, that was commissioned by a collector in 2010 for one of Alfredo Ramos Martinez's original paintings.
I would like to acknowledge curator Amy Galpin, Ph. D, and give a Bravo! for an engaging and stimulating exhibit.
image(Gallery view of Flora Kao’s: Homestead exhibition)

Our third and final stop at Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA) opening reception was Flora Kao's: Homestead exhibition, which was located in the Project Room gallery.
The premise for Homestead was, "Flora Kao highlights the poignant histories of deserted shacks that dot the Mojave Desert, remnants of America’s most recent wave of manifest destiny. By virtue of the Small Tract Act of 1938"
"Through life-size rubbings of each side of the dilapidated shack’s four walls, Kao captures the homestead at a specific moment in its decay."
Flora Kao’s approach was very new to me exhibition wise, which made it that much more interesting to study. Walking into the Project Room gallery, my sense of smell was first activated with an almost musky odor lingering in the space, which I think came from the canvases absorbing the redolences of the Mojave desert. Then came the visual sensory, as the canvas rubbings surrounded us. I could vividly perceive myself in the Mojave Desert inside the exact same shack Flora used for the installations rubbings. All that was necessary to transpire for the full experience was the sweltering heat and dust from the mostly barren wasteland for the full effect.


I would like to thank Emma Jacobson-Sive, Director of Public Relations, the PMCA staff, artist and curators that were involved in all three exhibits at the Pasadena Museum of California Art.
More info on these three amazing exhibitions visit: pmcaonline.org
On view January 19–April 20, 2014

More images of the opening reception exhibition also at: CHICANO ART MOVEMENT/Facebook page